John Gibson’s Jugular

The Gay Blogosphere just went into overdrive. 

If you thought MSNBC’s Courtney Hazlett’s comments about Heath Ledger’s death were tacky, get a load of this:  John Gibson of Fox News outright made fun of Heath’s death on his radio show–and MSNBC’s Dan Abrams and Joe Scarboro blasted him for it:

(How ironic that the aforementioned Courtney’s in the Abrams clip?)

As Crooks&Liars points out, GLADD is circulating a petition, and Perez Hilton has a list of Fox’s advertisers.  Queerty linked to the Abrams clip with much hurrah, and Huffpo covered it as well. 

Gibson’s “apology”:

GIBSON: Now it’s time for “My Word.” I have received comments regarding remarks I made on my radio show the other night after the shocking death of Heath Ledger. I’m sorry that some took my comments as anti-gay and insensitive. I’m aware that Ledger has a family and many fans who were grief-stricken by his sudden death.

As I speak, a crowd is gathering at the funeral home where Ledger’s funeral services will be held. Those who knew him say he was a good actor and a loving dad. And what happened to him was terrible, but was evidently an accident. Once again, to anyone offended by my comments, I’m sorry. But I’m also sorry that Heath Ledger is no longer alive and with us.

That is “My Word.”

Clearly we can take from this that John Gibson’s word is a lie.  He’s “sorry” that “some” took his comments as anti-gay and insensitive?  Are you kidding me? 

As Andy pointed out,

Last night, Gibson defended his “little Brokeback Mountain joke,” saying he’s lived off that “I wish I knew how to quit you” comment for months, saying “I’m not giving that up.”

So mocking the fags is nothing new for Gibson.  Except he wasn’t mocking one of us this time, just someone who dared play gay in a drama. 

No wonder these people don’t believe in evolution.  It’s never happened to them. 

I think GayRightsWatch may have put it best:

Simply put Fox News Radio host John Gibson is a heartless asshole.

Hopefully the last laugh will be on him. Ennis Del Mar has suffered enough. 

And I didn’t even really like that movie that much. 

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12 thoughts on “John Gibson’s Jugular

  1. Gibson is the weirdo he’s looking for.

    He had this creepy editorial in 2006, which I can only interpret as a thinly veiled call for the preservation of the “Master Race.” This is so blatantly racist and disturbing, I’m surprised nobody said anything at the time. Come on, NBC sacked Don Imus for much less.

  2. So he didn’t apologize for his comments, but apologized for people misinterpreting his comments. The classic non-apology “apology.”

  3. Is it wrong of me that I’m not so much interested in the gay hate speech angle but in the fact that far too soon after a young actor and father’s untimely passing, Gibson had to get his shots in? The particulars of the slurring seem less important to me than the fact that Gibson got away with the slur period.

    It makes little sense that Imus gets removed and Gibson’s inappropriate, shrill voice is still being heard.

  4. I think it does largely depend on “whom” we’re talking about. If Heath Ledger wasn’t a young actor but a young war criminal, I think we’d be less inclined to defend him from slurs of any kind – gay-related or otherwise.

  5. I disagree, at least for myself. While there is plenty of time to consider someone’s life after they die and give due credit to all their faults, the time immediately after the loss of life is not appropriate for that, regardless of the gravity of transgression.

    That’s my issue with Gibson’s remarks. In a way, he has a point. A lot of truck has been gotten out of that quote for many different purposes and no one’s complained before. The difference in this case is appropriate timing. While the joke would have been just as tasteless as little as a week from now, there would at least have been a space of propriety, a cooling-off period. Instead of looking like an hypocritical monster, Gibson would have just looked like a painfully unfunny asshole.

  6. Is it wrong of me that I’m not so much interested in the gay hate speech angle but in the fact that far too soon after a young actor and father’s untimely passing, Gibson had to get his shots in?

    No.

    Because I feel exactly the same way .

  7. It’s the early mocking of a tragic death that bothers me the most, QJ, but the implication of “he deserved it” for playing gay in a movie is almost as disturbing.

    Have your opinions and criticize an actor all you want for his choice of roles, but I’d say the first month after he tragically passes, leaving a young daughter without a father, would be the minimum amount of time to keep your bigoted mouth shut. (Not YOU-you, the general “you”)

  8. Now, I understand hindsight is 20/20, but were the allies “wrong” to mock the memory of Hilter immediately after his death? If Osama Bin Laden dies of illness, should America observe a one-month period of mourning before we start gloating? What about serial killers like John Wayne Gacy or Charles Manson?

    There are certain people, whose deeds were so demonstrably horrible, that I’d have a hard time defending them. And it doesn’t matter whether it’s a day or a century after their death. There aren’t many that I would put in this category. But I’m reluctant to say all deaths must be treated exactly the same way.

    And I know many strongly disagree. There are many arguments rooted in certain religious beliefs (the holiness of all human life, the universality of sin, and so forth), and I respect that. But personally, I find it difficult to not make negative judgments about recently deceased mass murderers and such.

  9. but the implication of “he deserved it” for playing gay in a movie is almost as disturbing

    Sort of like the “implication” that Hollywood was homophobic because Brokeback didn’t get an Oscar for Best Picture.

    And now to fully extend my catty claws; if I were
    Queerty and Perez Hilton, I suppose I would jealously guard Brokeback and push it, because it would be a far better advertisement for gay people then their lives have ever been.

    But for the rest of us, it’s just a movie.

  10. were the allies “wrong” to mock the memory of Hilter immediately after his death? If Osama Bin Laden dies of illness, should America observe a one-month period of mourning before we start gloating? What about serial killers like John Wayne Gacy or Charles Manson?

    Truthfully? Yes, in a way. There is a difference between breathing a sigh of relief when a tyrant or a dangerous person passes to mocking the loss of life. To immediately rejoice or make light of death, no matter how necessary or deserved it may have been, erodes the separation in character between the dead tyrant and those who survive him.

    It’s not about defending them or their actions. Please Note I never said that one shouldn’t consider a person’s actions in life after their passing. It’s about showing a reverence for life and a respect for the uniqueness of living that the “evil” person lacked and is being judged for. It’s another case of the bad actions of B being used to excuse the bad actions of A.

    The bottom line to me is that everyone has a story and their story is unique and that uniqueness deserves consideration in its own right. While they are living, people can defend their own stories and attack the stories of others for a multitude of reasons. For a period after their passing, however, it behooves those of us left to simply consider the uniqueness of the story if for no other reason than our own stories weren’t theirs.

  11. [[Truthfully? Yes, in a way.]]

    Fair enough. At least you’re consistent.

    ———–

    And NDT, I think movies are an artform. While I personally didn’t believe Brokeback Mountain rose to the level of a bona fide masterpiece, great movies are no different from a fine painting or bottle of wine. It wasn’t a bad movie, by any means. It’s simply neither a classic nor particularly groundbreaking IMHO.

    But to say Citizen Kane was “just a movie” is like saying Michelangelo’s David is “just a statue.” The motion picture is one of America’s most enduring contribution to global culture. Other countries have movies, but we’re the ones who have nurtured it from the beginning.

  12. Sort of like the “implication” that Hollywood was homophobic because Brokeback didn’t get an Oscar for Best Picture.

    No, NDT, I’d say that’s just juvenile. Not disturbing.

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