Like This Needs a Caption . . .

“The Armor of God PJ’s were inspired by a mother reading Ephesians 6:10-18 every night to her daughter to give her a safe and secure feeling in the dark. As they read the scriptures, they put on each spiritual and powerful piece of the Armor of God to keep them safe and peaceful while they slept. At that moment, God gave me the idea how wonderful it would be if all children could have the opportunity to put on a pair of pajamas that symbolized the Armor of God for the same purpose… that with their belief in Jesus and His protection they will feel safe and secure during the night as they sleep. As they dress in the mornings, they should replace them with the spiritual Armor of God to protect them in their daily activities.”

False Idols, anyone?  I’m all for letting kids sleep soundly, but this sounds suspiciously like those Mormon supergarments that deflect bullets or something like that.  Faith should involve how you live your life, not how you dress. 

I guess I need to go buy a cape or something.

ht BoingBoing

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3 thoughts on “Like This Needs a Caption . . .

  1. Oh, dear, I’m not sure how to feel about this. While I completely agree with you that faith is about how you live your life, not how you dress (nicely put, by the way), when you’re a kid you sometimes need ritual and concrete manifestations of that faith. Hell, even now when I’m…um, no longer a kid, I still like a good bit of ritual as a sort of touchestone. Probably part of the reason I love Japanese food so much is the inherant ritual involved in eating it.

    Yes, it’s sort of tacky, but in a way, it’s also kind of nice. Hopefully, this will lead to the children internalizing their faith and be willing to stand strong for their convictions while understanding that faith, while comfortable, does need to be changed and washed regularly or else it begins to smell.

    Mind you, I’m really uncomfortable with the fanatical gleem in the eyes of that little boy. And I’m not sure how much sleep those kids are going to get with that headgear.

  2. Hopefully, this will lead to the children internalizing their faith and be willing to stand strong for their convictions while understanding that faith, while comfortable, does need to be changed and washed regularly or else it begins to smell.

    LOL

    While I’m all for internalizing faith, and I understand the power of symbols, especially where children are concerned, I think this sends the wrong message. Faith does not “armor” your body as such; faith, for me, strengthens my spirit and soul, this body being only a vessel. I can see longstanding detrimental repercussions from something like this. And while a strong faith, I’m convinced, can help build strong character, “fanatical gleem” (gleam?) is not too far off the mark.

    I really think this sends the wrong message to children. Especially about Christ’s message. How can you spread love if you are so busy keeping up a pretentious image of being “armored?”

    I dunno.

  3. Is it gleam? I never know. My spelling is atrocious, but that’s why I usually have editors and spell check.

    I guess you do have a point in that while it may be giving children spiritual shoring-up, it may also be teaching them to insulate themselves from the world through their faith, which is utterly the wrong message. I see a value in teaching children that faith in something (be it god, the human spirit or what have you) can provide a comfort and a sort of protection in one’s life, but perhaps actually having children don The PJs Of The Armor Of God is going overboard.

    I dunno either. 🙂

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